All Quiet on the Western Front
All Quiet on the Western Front
NR | 29 April 1930 (USA)
All Quiet on the Western Front Trailers

When a group of idealistic young men join the German Army during World War I, they are assigned to the Western Front, where their patriotism is destroyed by the harsh realities of combat.

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Reviews
VeteranLight

I don't have all the words right now but this film is a work of art.

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Intcatinfo

A Masterpiece!

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Ava-Grace Willis

Story: It's very simple but honestly that is fine.

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Allison Davies

The film never slows down or bores, plunging from one harrowing sequence to the next.

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movieHIT88

Can't believe it took till now for me to see this wonderful film. Although made in 1930, it has a currency which did not go unnoticed. Other films, with similar themes, have not equalled or captured so tenderly the complete waste of young minds, bodies and lives that war demands. The film stresses the falsehoods which continue to be told to trick young "adventures" into sacrificing all to the theatre of war and the pressure that is put on them if they dare resist. The film emphasises the impact on the stoic but tortured families who are waiting back home, waiting for bad news which can come at any hour or if their loved ones do come home, the families are "gifted", often, the role of lifetime carers of their damaged husbands, fathers, brothers, sons and friends and now we can add returning women to the list. AQOTWF is one of the best anti-war movies ever made and one which matches Gallipoli for its poignancy. Highly recommend.

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talula1060

I absolutely love this book and have read many times, so was expecting to feel a similar love for the film. Although there were parts that were gut wrenching (the guy who discovers his leg has been amputated, the madness that ensues after repeated shelling), I had a major problem with the acting. Because sound was so new in film, many of the actors were doing a lot of exaggerated movements and making faces after every line. Lew Ayres was the biggest culprit. He yelled many of his lines, constantly posed for the camera, and in several instances, he started to say the wrong lines and came off sounding like he was reading it. He's not very good at sound movies and it's really a plum role for an actor. He only redeemed himself when he came back home and gave his little monologue in the classroom. He spoke with passion and resolve and was believable for the first time in the film. I was very disheartened to see how badly acted most of this film was because the story is a heartbreaking statement on the horrors of war and the pointlessness of it all. Another pet peeve is the way so many of the actors smile throughout the film as though they were on a Broadway stage. It wasn't written that way in the book and there are certainly other ways to show satisfaction with comfortable boots than having the actors grinning as they march into certain death. It's ridiculous. Someone else mentioned that if this film had been shot a couple years later, it would have been better and I agree completely. Sound was so new that the early years were filled with silent actors who brought that same dramatic, expressive sensibility to the screen. I know there's also a silent version of this film which might work better with the way it's acted. I can't express enough what a complete shame it is that Milestone couldn't have directed these guys better or else cast others in the role who understood the importance of the subtleties in each character and the changes wrought by the war. He had a very large budget for the time and was able to reshoot all of the mother's scenes so why not have the actors do more than one take? Why not notice that the dead French soldier has a different expression every time the camera is on his face? If Paul is dreaming of home, you don't need Ayres to have a dreamy look on his face. Also, bread submerged in water would fall apart. There are so many little things that should have been be caught. I know there's a remake of the film from the 70s, but this movie really only works in black and white. This was shot 11 years after the war's end which is only fitting. I would have loved to see a German version of this movie as it would be interesting to see how they approached it. Great story, but film rendition is ruined by shoddy acting and sloppy blocking.

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Brandin Lindsey

All Quiet on the Western Front is a World War I movie released in 1930. Following the main character, Paul, a young German student that gets swept up by nationalist fever, the story shows the misery of war. As soldiers starve, fight for their lives, and struggle to maintain their sanity, none of them can quite explain what they're fighting for. Paul's notions of life and war are immediately shattered and the film follows his progression as he questions the meaning of his life and the purpose of the war.An example: "How does a war even start?" "It's when one country offends another." "Well, I guess I can go home because I'm not offended."This is a perfect example of the mindset and attitudes displayed by the characters who are simply trying to survive and find enough food for another day.Dramatic and heart-wrenching, All Quiet on the Western Front is one of the best WWI films. As you watch the film, you quickly forget that all of the main characters are fighting for Germany, who are usually displayed in more villainous roles. In fact, you can switch the uniforms and it would have no impact on the story and I think that is the point. Paul quickly realizes that war is not glorious and he certainly does not feel like a hero. This realization directly conflicts with his initial feelings when enlisting for the war in the first place. The main conflict of the story is Paul reconciling the myths and naivety of his youth with a horrific, almost purposeless, reality. Treated as a hero at home and given constant advice about the war from elderly men who are far from the front lines, Paul loses his sense of home and purpose and is left lost in the new world he discovers.Despite some poor acting at times and humor that has not aged well, All Quiet on the Western Front is a good film. If you're interested in an early film about soldiers in the Great War, it's definitely worth a watch.

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oOoBarracuda

I kicked off my February, which is always Oscar's month, with All Quiet on the Western Front. Director Lewis Milestone's wartime drama took home the Academy's top prize for 1930. Capturing the essence of the individuals directly involved in the conflict, All Quiet on the Western Front, is a magnificent look at the effects of war both on soldiers physicality and mentality. A poignant look at a time when many fighting were just young boys trying to be heroes, All Quiet on the Western Front seems worthy of the gold statuette.Opening inside a classroom, a professor is convincing a classroom of impressionable teenagers to enlist, revealing the first unfortunate aspect of WWI. In the cloak of patriotism, a group of young men vow to support their country in war. Many of them end up permanently injured, some losing limbs, all of them end up emotionally scarred. The incredible part of this is that it was 1930. Seeing such a raw portrayal was incredible. The shots of each young man's face were well-done and beautifully executed each time. A well-done film, All Quiet on the Western Front is definitely one to see.

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