Goldfinger
Goldfinger
PG | 20 September 1964 (USA)
Goldfinger Trailers

Special agent 007 comes face to face with one of the most notorious villains of all time, and now he must outwit and outgun the powerful tycoon to prevent him from cashing in on a devious scheme to raid Fort Knox -- and obliterate the world's economy.

Reviews
Nonureva

Really Surprised!

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Pacionsbo

Absolutely Fantastic

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Glucedee

It's hard to see any effort in the film. There's no comedy to speak of, no real drama and, worst of all.

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Darin

One of the film's great tricks is that, for a time, you think it will go down a rabbit hole of unrealistic glorification.

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classicalsteve

By the last couple of decades of the 20th century and into the first decades of the 21st century, action films became the highest grossing offerings from Hollywood. Prior to circa 1960, period dramas were more often the pictures which brought movie-goers into the theater seats with their popcorn: "Gone with the Wind", "Spartacus", "Ben Hur", etc. A few action-suspense films, such as those directed by Alfred Hitchcock and film noir, did also bring in the box office bucks. Westerns were probably the most prevalent action movie prior to James Bond but many of them were lower-budgeted B-films. In 1956, the only action movie among the top-10 grossing films was "The Searchers", a western starring John Wayne. All others in the top-10 were epic period pictures and dramas. However, by circa 2000, the reigning king of film genres became the action film. By 2014, 50 years later, all the top-10 grossing films were action-oriented including science fiction, fantasy and/or superhero. Unlike decades gone by, the highest-grossing films and best picture winners are almost never the same. The original James Bond films of the 1960's, particularly "Goldfinger", paved the way and included so many of the elements currently found in the genre. Firstly, the James Bond films were the first action films outside of detective films/series and Westerns to feature a recurring character in multiple offerings. Secondly, much of the genre's formula was established with "Goldfinger" and other Connery-Bond installments. The action doesn't begin with the main plot but instead begins with Bond engaged in another mission as a kind of "prelude" to the main story. This device has been used ever since ad infinitum, such as in some of the later Die Hard films with Detective John McClane (Bruce Willis) which began in the late 1980's and even up to the Mission Impossible films starring Tom Cruise in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Thirdly, Bond makes little funny comments which has become such a trademark in entertainment action films. Often these comments are in the wake of a kill. For example, in "Dr. No", Bond kills a man with a bow and arrow and says, "I think he got the point.""Goldfinger" became the second-highest grossing film of 1964 behind "My Fair Lady" and is probably one of the two best Connery/Bond films, the other "From Russia with Love". The plot is typical of many of the Bond stories: a kingpin criminal magnate, called simply Goldfinger, is suspected of smuggling large amounts of gold out of first-world nations and possibly reselling it to third world nations who pay more. (This couldn't happen today since international markets constantly track the price of gold.) James Bond (Sean Connery), Agent 007, is sent on a mission to find out about Goldfinger (Gert Fröbe). Turns out he's vacationing at the same hotel in Miami Beach as Bond! Then Bond turns up at a golf course where Goldfinger just happens to be playing. The informal gold, I mean golf competition, is worth the price of admission alone.The trail leads to a complex in Switzerland where Bond finds out about an operation called "Grand Slam". Bond doesn't know what Grand Slam is but is apprehended by the baddies in which Bond is shackled to a table and going to be sliced into pieces for 007 sandwiches by a laser. Bond must find out the nature of Goldfinger's scheme, but if he doesn't somehow get off the table, it will be Bond mince pies. Eventually he also meets Pussy Galore (Honor Blackman), a beautiful blond who knows automatic weapons, judo and airplane flying. She is part of Goldfinger's operation for the money and immune to Bond's "charms".A very enjoyable installment in the Bond canon and does uphold relatively well. Some of the sequences were a bit unbelievable by today's standards, such as Goldfinger puts only one guard on Bond initially. Of course the guard is not given reinforcements and Bond easily subdues him! (Goldfinger should be smart enough to use a lot more manpower to guard a hired assassin!) Although we may expect a bit more from action pictures (or may we don't!), the Bond cycle was the original blueprint which has influenced so many action films for over the next half-century. The series itself has continued at this writing with Daniel Craig as 007, for my money the best Bond since Connery. Still the Connery-Bond installments still provide good escapist entertainment. Pass the popcorn.

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Danny S.

The third is a charm, as it proves "Goldfinger", the great third installment of James Bond franchise!With Guy Hamilton hopping in as a director and John Barry accompanying him in making the movie, they made no mistake!James Bond (Sean Connery) is sent to investigate the gold smuggling led by Auric Goldfinger (Gert Fröbe). What simply is supposed to be a gold smuggling, it's much more dastardly and a really great villain scheme, Operation Grand Slam! Bond not only has to fight Goldfinger but his deadly and memorable henchman Oddjob (Harold Sakata). Bond gets to meet the girl who'd be measured as a equal, Pussy Galore (Honor Blackman)!James Bond goes across Mexico, Miami, United Kingdom, Switzerland all the way to Fort Knox, Kentucky to prevent Goldfinger from his deadly scheme! Is Goldfinger the villain that's so memorable that doesn't hesitate to kill Bond?The pre-title sequence is solid at its' best, but that reflection in the girl's eye is a bit ridiculous in my opinion. But wait... there's the first theme song sang beautifully by Shirley Bassey! Desmond Llewelyn has been finally credited as Q in this movie, showing his basement and introducing us to the iconic Aston Martin DB5.Shirley Eaton and Tania Mallet portray Jill and Tilly Masterson as two of Bond Girls, but the ultimate Bond girl is Pussy Galore, who's tough, knows Judo and doesn't succumb to Bond's charm until the end of the movie! Gert Fröbe is so amazing as Auric Goldfinger and his scheme is brilliant even by today's standards. Would you believe it that he was dubbed by Michael Collins? Harold Sakata is awesome in his role as a mute Oddjob, who's also able to defy the pain when James throws a gold bar at his chest. We have Felix Leiter back again, but this time recast with Cec Linder, who does his work pretty well and helps James to prevent Goldfinger's scheme.Goldfinger is indeed a great film, introducing us to the gadgets, humor, one liners and many other things Bond fans desire. Sean Connery's performance is really great!5 out of 5 stars!

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Dalbert Pringle

Such a cold "finger"!?.... Yeah-Yeah. I know that Goldfinger was, of course, a James Bond-007 movie, but, all the same, it was kinda boring and, yes, downright, dumb at times.(And, I know that this isn't going to go over very well) - But when I watched actor Sean Connery really closely I found that there was something oddly "gay" about him. There was! I can't quite put my finger (gold, or not) on what exactly it was about Connery's mannerisms that sparked my "gaydar" suspicions - But, hey - What the hell, eh? - I'm allowed.Anyways - All-in-all - I did enjoy Goldfinger for the most part, but I certainly wouldn't rate this one as great entertainment, not by a long-shot.In conclusion - I ask you - How the hell (in the name of Miss Moneypenny) does one go about painting an adult, human body from head to toe, front to back, without making even the slightest mess out of the whole damn job? Eh? How? - 'Cause that ain't no easy task to undertake. No. It ain't! But in Goldfinger this task's final product was made to look like it was done as easy as pie.

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ElMaruecan82

Here's a little test: think of "Dr. No", which images immediately come to your mind? I suspect it's a tie between bikini-clad Ursula Andress making her iconic entrance in the beach and the first shot of James Bond, lighting his cigarette with that cool and deadpan expression while introducing for the first time the classic "Bond. James Bond." And now, just think of a third image. You might have many shots and lines flooding over your memory but to call them iconic would be a stretch. Now, do exactly the same test with "Goldfinger". What images come to tout mind? Is it Bond in white tuxedo looking at the exotic dancer while lighting a cigarette (and something else in the process) or is it Bond wearing that blue polo in Miami Beach and introducing himself to Jill Masterson (a shot featured in Spielberg's film "Catch Me If You Can")? Is it the first shot at the Aston Martin, Pussy Galore or Auric Goldfinger playing cards or briefing about his plan? Speaking of Goldfinger, maybe it is the opening song, the staple to all James Bond opening credits? Or that shocking sight of a dead woman painted in gold? Or how about a special drink ordered by 007 in a plane? I can go on and on, from the deadly hat trick of Oddjob, the mute Korean right- hand man, the car chase or the classic laser pointing at perhaps Bond's most vulnerable spot."Goldfinger" is just full of unforgettable images, one after another, that all contributed to build the legend of 007, if "Dr. No" was the starter, this one is the sure thing, the one you can show to someone who never saw any James Bond. It just creates the perfect 'bond' with old or new fans, now what is the secret? I think the secret is in the title; the film is as much about Bond as it is about the villain, wonderfully played by Gert Fröbe. One of the most common tropes about Bond is that the villain's identity is revealed a bit later but "Goldfinger" follows the principle that a story is as good as its villain. Auric Goldfinger, the man with the deadly Midas touch, is a rather mundane and not intimidating gold investor, but beware of his hubris, this is a businessman who means business. The first scene shows him cheating at cards and it says a lot about him, he wants to get rich the easy way, and it's not about the quantity but the value, too. So, we clearly see from the first shocking death what this man is capable of to whoever steps in his territory, and it's surprising how many times Bond is actually disarmed by Goldfinger or his henchmen. But you know the pattern of Bond movies, Bond never dies and the villain never kills him whenever he has the opportunity, the trick is to make it believable, and for some reason, if Goldfinger isn't immune to the villain's monologue accusation, the fact that he was painted as a three-dimensional character makes it believable that he'd rather keep James Bond prisoner and show off about his clever high-scale plans, than killing him and leave his secret plan unknown. And you can tell how delighted Bond is to tickle Goldfinger's ego and let him reveal more of his scheme. In fact, you can also tell, that Connery has fun playing Bond, after two performances, he mastered it enough and knows exactly when to play it cool and when to play it tough.This is not the kind of film where performances are to be praised, but I've been so admiring of Connery's 'presence' in "Dr. No" that I think he deserves a few mentions here. Connery has a capability to find the right tone for the right moment, in a scene when he tries to break out of jail, look at the way he teases the guard, smiles at him and plays hide-and-seek, this is not out of character, this is a secret agent who also knows how to play a role. But look at his frightened expression when he see the gold-painted Jill or when he stares at that ominous laser, these are genuine moments where he can't really pull the tough guy facade. There are two Bonds playing, the secret agent and the man, and the trick is to always keep a fine line between both and when it comes to women, it's a whole different story.Bond is a man who seduces as much as is being seduced, and on that level, he's rather self-conscious, but he loves to play the game nonetheless and deliver his lines as if he really had to show more than his pretty face and athletic looks, there's got to be that little icing on the cake, the woman has to play 'hard to get', it's part of the game, and never has a preliminary been as sensual as the karate contest in the barn. The music is playful like a little interlude except that it plays on strength, on fighting skills as if Bond had to maintain his manly reputation on that level, as if Pussy Galore needed more than the little charming rhapsody. And why not, she's perhaps the most bad-ass Bond Girl, she flies a plane, leads a commando and she doesn't need to be naked to assert her sexiness, she's quite a match for Bond and she's one of the reasons the film works.In fact, I don't think of any Bond movies that succeed on every level: Bond, the villains, the girls, the song, the lines, the spectacular action, the high-scale super villain's scheme, everything. This is why "Goldfinger" is the film that really established Connery as the ultimate Bond. If only for "Goldfinger", Connery could never be matched. Action and seduction-wise, this is a Bond that would leave anyone shaken… not stirred.

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